Sunsets at Ocean Point Inn are nothing less than SPECTACULAR any time of the year! How many times have you looked at your photos and thought to yourself, “That’s not what it looked like!” Shooting sunsets with a point & shoot camera can be challenging, but whether you are using a point and shoot camera or a more sophisticated DLSR, you can still create great sunset images with a few basic tips!

 If you are an early bird, you can get some great sunrise photos in East Boothbay at Little River or go into town to the aquarium at McKown Point to get the sun rising over Boothbay Harbor!

So how can you improve your sunrise/sunset photos? Here are some tips!

  1. Be prepared!  Prepare ahead of time. Scout out your favorite spot since the sun rises and sets at a different angle depending on the time of year. Gather and check your equipment before you head out to shoot. Be sure to have your manual nearby. Equipment that will enhance your experience includes a tripod & cable/wireless release for slower shutter speeds and lens wipes or a lens pen to keep your lens spotless, saving you time in the post process! A great website, http://sunrisesunset.com gives you sunrise, sunset, twilight and moon information.
  2. Shoot in RAW! If your camera has RAW file format capability, try it!  The files are larger, but you can capture much more detail and can pull many more highlights out in the post processing than you can when shooting jpegs. You can shoot in both, but be sure you have a large enough SD card to accommodate the large files.  Your photos may not look as vibrant as a jpeg straight out of the camera, but with a little post processing in LightRoom, PhotoShop or one of the many free photo editing programs you’ll see a world of difference.
  3. The Golden Hour! The golden hour gives you the most desirable light with a warm glow. 1/2 hour before sunrise & after sunset gives a soft peaceful mood. I’ve never been a morning person, but the light at sunrise can’t be beat and never disappoints. Be patient! Some of the best color comes before the sun comes up over the horizon at sunrise and after it has gone below the horizon at sunset! If you are up early enough during a sunrise or patient enough during a sunset you can even catch The Blue Hour. Clouds add character to your sunset photos filled with color and you may also catch them reflecting in the water if you’re lucky. Turn off Auto White Balance and set your White Balance to Cloudy.
  4. Use a tripod! Whenever possible, use a tripod for your sunrise/sunset photos. Check your manual and use Mirror Lock Up to avoid shaky photos. Try different perspectives shooting low to the ground or high up. Shoot wide and then zoom in. Frame your shot and shoot! Change your perspective as you shoot so you don’t get 100 versions of the same shot! Use a cable release or wireless release to reduce shaking even more.
  5. Metering! Typically you want to point at the color you want to capture (look for pinks and purples), but you need to think about what you want to capture. Do you want silhouettes of people and interesting foreground features? Meter for the sky. Do you want to focus on the foreground without washing out the background? Meter for the foreground and use your exposure compensation (find this in your manual as it differs form camera to camera). It depends on your cameras dynamic range and it is challenging to get a balanced exposure in one shot.  To pick up highlights and lowlights try bracketing your shots shooting one at normal exposure, one under exposed and one overexposed.  Use your Live View to see the results and play with the settings trying +/-1 to +/-2 for your bracket. Your camera may also have a built in HDR (High Dynamic Range) setting where you set the bracketing range and it takes 3 photos in a row.  You will need to merge those in a  photo editing software to get the HDR effect.
  6. Aperture Priority!  Shoot in Aperture Priority (A or Av mode depending on your camera) and your shutter speed will be set for you. A larger number on your aperture (f/11, f/16, f/22) will give you the starburst effect and also will slow down your shutter speed  increasing the need for a tripod. Shoot wide (16-24mm) at f/22 for your best starburst!
  7. ISO! Turn off Automatic ISO and set it to the lower end for your camera, 100 or 200. The higher the ISO the more grain you will get in your photos. Today’s DSLRs can handle some high ISOs without getting too grainy. It mostly matters if you want very large format prints.
  8. Shutter Speed! This will automatically be set if you are in Aperture mode. You can use your Exposure Compensation to increase or decrease the exposure in this mode. Check your manual for the location of the button with a +/- on it for exposure compensation.
  9. Vivid Colors!  Some cameras have a setting for Picture Control such as vivid colors, landscape, or portrait under the Menu.  Slightly underexposing will also bring out the vivid colors.
  10. Get creative and Have FUN with it! And lastly, always look in the opposite directions of the sun, too. You can get some amazing reflections in windows and some beautiful colors!

Try out these tips and share your Ocean Point sites with us on our Ocean Point Inn Flickr page.

Download Sunrise/Sunset Tips —–> Sunrise:Sunset Photo Tips.

Do you have a favorite garden that you love to visit? Gardens flourish along the coast of Maine! They thrive in the morning fog as they are bathed in the cool mist that protects them from the scorching summer heat.

House & Garden Tours
In the month of July you can enjoy House & Garden Tours from southern Maine to mid-coast Maine all the way up to Downeast Maine. Book your stay at OPI on July 20/21 and you will be close by for two garden tours: Thursday in Camden and Friday in Boothbay.

Garden Tour Links
  Garden Tours from Portland to Bar Harbor 
 July 20, 2017 – 70th Annual Camden House & Garden Tour
 July 21, 2017 – Boothbay Region Garden Club Home & Garden Tour. Tickets may be purchased at the Boothbay Harbor Region Chamber of Commerce, 192 Townsend Ave., Boothbay Harbor, ME 04538 or by calling 207-633-2353 starting June 1. Tickets are $30 prepaid and $35 the day of the tour.

 

Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens

To take in some glorious gardens on your own schedule while staying at Ocean Point Inn, enjoy its close proximity to the the award winning, 270-acre Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, open May 1 through October 31st. You can explore CMBG on your own or take a one-hour guided cart tour for a small fee. Mobility scooters are available for a rental fee and wheelchairs are available for loan at no charge. Check their website for information about making reservations for carts ahead of time. Golf carts make frequent stops along the various trails and you can hop on/off should you prefer a “free ride” to walking. The Beagle, the first Coast Guard certified all-electric vessel in Maine, offers five one-hour tours per day where you will see lobstermen, wildlife including seals and osprey, and of course the famous hand-cranked Trevett Bridge!

You can spend a full day at the gardens or go back every day of your vacation and never see the same thing twice!  Tea & Tulips kicks off the season in May with other special events throughout the season. The colors and flowers are ever changing from Spring through the Fall.

Some of the attractions include the Giles Rhododendron Garden & Waterfall, the Vayo Meditation Garden, the Haney Hillside Garden, the Woodland Garden, the Arbor Garden, The Burpee Kitchen Garden, the Lerner Garden of the Five Senses and the Shoreland Trail. The two-acre Bibby and Harold Alfond Children’s Garden, designed by landscape architect Herb Schaal, who specializes in designing educational gardens for children and also designed the Lerner Garden of the Five Senses, opened in 2010. Inspired by Maine children’s literature, this garden is interactive and will bring out your inner child as you walk across the rope bridge of the tree house. No worries, all the features are made to accommodate children of all ages!

Many educational opportunities, for children and adults alike, are available at the Bosarge Family Educations Center. These range from horticulture & gardening to photography, garden crafts and wellness.  Check their website and calendar for the full listing of possibilities.

A spectacular sight to see from mid-November through New Year’s Eve for the past two years has been Gardens Aglow, a 360,000 energy efficient LED light display decorating the central gardens and buildings. The towns of Boothbay, Boothbay Harbor, Southport and Edgecomb joined in the festivities in 2016 by introducing the Festival of Lights. Businesses and residents joined in with light displays and activities such as Festival of Trees, Harbor Lights Festival, North Pole Express and the Gingerbread Spectacular.  Don’t miss the 2017 extravaganza!

Roadside Treasures!

In early June, lupine is plentiful along the roadside heading from the traffic light in town to East Boothbay, on the road to Southport at the crossroad before the bridge, on the East side of the Harbor beyond the Catholic Church and by the westside of the footbridge to name a few. It is a sight to behold and will be gone once July rolls in.

 

When you return to Ocean Point you can take a walk around the Point to admire the many flowers and gardens along the water’s edge! Enjoy!

 

All Rights Reserved – Photos ©Bev Tabet Photography

Swing bridges are pretty unique and the Boothbay Harbor area is lucky enough to have two of Maine’s finest: the Southport Bridge and the Trevett Bridge, also known as the Barters Island Bridge. The Southport Bridge is motorized and the Trevett Bridge is manually opened, cranked by Dwight or Duane Lewis, twin brothers who have operated the bridges for 50+ years! The Trevett Bridge, connecting Barters Island to Hodgdon Island, is the last hand-cranked swing bridge still operating in the state of Maine! The most often asked question is “Does he get dizzy?”

You can listen to a 2005 interview with Dwight and Duane here.

In the summer, they crank the bridge open up to twelve times a day on weekends and six times a day during the week.  It’s a treat to watch and even more of a treat to help crank it open and catch a ride if you are brave enough to offer your services.

Enjoy one of the best lobster rolls in the area on the deck of the Trevett Country Store and you’ll have a good chance of experiencing the bridge opening.

The gates are lowered by hand and the bridge operator cranks in a circular motion as the center span of the bridge rotates on a fulcrum and allows boats to pass the center span on either side. If you take an electric boat tour from the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens you can enjoy a water view from The Beagle as you pass through the bridge.

If you are a movie buff you may have seen the Trevett Bridge in the 2001 film, In the Bedroom, starring Sissy Spacek and Marisa Tomei. You can see it here in the movie trailer at about 2:00 minutes in.

Built in 1931, the bridge is slated for an estimated $4,250,000 DOT rehabilitation project in 2017. According to a 2015 article by Bill Pearson in the Boothbay Register, this project tops the list as the most expensive of the 50 projects slated for Lincoln County in their 3-year work plan. Public hearings are being held in March and April. It will remain a swing bridge, but will the bridge remain manually operated?  Residents of Trevett and Barters Island certainly hope so. They don’t want memories of this iconic bridge to leave the island.

So hustle over to Trevett and give Dwight or Duane a hand with the crank so you can return home with an unbelievable story to share with your family and friends!  You might want to have someone videotape it or your friends and family will think it’s just another Maine fish story!

View videos of the bridge opening below!

All photos and videos by Bev Tabet Photography

Your vacation at Ocean Point Inn isn’t complete without a day trip to Camden-Rockport, only about an hour’s drive from OPI.

The Town of Camden, Maine, is a quaint, beautiful harbortown with many offerings. The town has seasonal events, gift shops, clothing and craft stores and of course restaurants!

A visit is not complete without lunch at the Camden Deli. The restaurant sits in the middle of town and boasts a second floor dining patio with views of the harbor and its sailboats. The food is reasonable and the staff is pleasant.  Eat in or get it to go and enjoy it at the top of Mt. Battie!

If you travel north one mile heading out of  town on Route 1 you will see an entrance to Camden Hills State Park on your left which is open daily from 9 a.m. to sunset. Upon entering you will pay a small fee and travel up a winding road to the top of Mt. Battie.  If you are adventurous you can park at the bottom and trek up the Megunticook Footpath and Adam’s Lookout Trail which is a 2.6 mile round trip hike.   You can relax and enjoy a picnic, explore Adam’s Lookout and take in the breathtaking views of Penobscot Bay, Camden Harbor, Mt. Desert Island and other ocean islands. It’s a great way to spend an afternoon!

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The view is spectacular and has been shown off in a number of Hollywood movies. The vistas are unmatched especially during Fall Foliage season and for watching fireworks on Independence Day or during Old Schooner Days. You can hike back down or take a leisurely walk down the 0.9 mile auto road to the parking lot.

On your return to the Boothbay peninsula you can stop off in Rockport to see the beloved statue of Andre the Seal who spent more than 20 summers in Rockport after swimming 150+ miles north from the New England Aquarium in Boston, Massachusetts each summer.

Continue on to Lincolnville to enjoy one last stop at Cellardoor Winery before returning home to OPI.  In addition to offering a free wine tasting, Cellardoor offers Classes & Pairings,  a Wine & Gift Shop, a viewing patio and afternoon tours.

What a great day trip to add to your Ocean Point memories!

 

 

You can’t walk or drive around the Ocean Point loop on Shore Road in East Boothbay, Maine without stopping to admire the Wilson Memorial Chapel.

The lovely, old stone chapel is non-demoninational and guest ministers, both local and those “from away,” lead the worship services on Sundays from the last weekend in June through the first weekend in September.  The Rev. Lewis Wilson honored his wife,  Janet M. Wilson, by naming the chapel for her and according to the Chapel records the first service was held in August of 1917 shortly after Rev. Wilson completed construction.

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As you walk up the stone steps and through the sturdy door of the Wilson Memorial Chapel you are transported back in time by the stonework, the brick, the woodwork and the gorgeous stained-glass windows. How many guest ministers have given a sermon here in 100 years? How many couples have walked down the brick aisle to pledge their love and speak their vows? How many friends who have passed away have been memorialized in this cozy, intimate place of worship? How many visitors have stood right where you are standing at that moment?

As you leave the chapel, the views of Fisherman’s Island and Ram Island greet you at the door. In winter the chapel gets blanketed in snow as it awaits the return of Ocean Point residents (Ocean Pointers as they’re called) and a host of new visitors who will appreciate its beauty, just as those who have come before them have.

The summer of 2017 will have many activities to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of this historic chapel. Here are a few activities from the Wilson Memorial Chapel’s March letter which can be downloaded here –> Wilson Chapel:

July 15-16 – 95th occasion of a visit to Ocean Point and the Chapel, from the Maine Seacoast Mission. The Sunbeam will be brought to the Boothbay Harbor area. Tours will be on Sunday, July 16th, from 11:00-1:00 via boat shuttles from the Card Cove dock.

July 21 – The Chapel will be included on the Boothbay Region Garden Club Home & Garden Tour

August 6 – Commemorative service at 1:30 p.m. followed by a reception at 2:30 and is open to all Ocean Pointers and friends, and their guests.

Check their new website (which will be online soon) for details of all activities.  www.wilsonmemorialchapel.org

Enjoy your visit to the Wilson Memorial Chapel . . . only a short walk away from the Ocean Point Inn!

Have you ever admired a stone wall winding through a field in New England? The most common antique structures in New England are its rock walls. Many were built by our European ancestors, but stone masons continue their craft even to this day, adding their personal, artistic touch to their work.

Before stone walls were built, farmers used wooden, zig-zag rail fences to separate their farms. It has been estimated that there are 16,000 miles of stonewalls across the six New England states. Most were built between 1790 and 1820 during an expansion of farmland.  The period from 1775 to 1825 was known as the Golden Age of stone wall building when more stone walls were built than at any other time. The walls served as boundary markers as farmers each spring moved them aside. Horses and oxen would drag stones on a wooden skid to the sides of their field. Taller walls served as pens for their farm animals.

Ocean Point Inn has been updating its gardens and rock walls. More photos coming after the “Spring Thaw.”

There are many online videos devoted to the construction of sturdy walls. Here are some helpful hints.

1. Safety – wear long pants, long sleeves, goggles, gloves and steel-toed shoes.
2. Work in an uncluttered workspace.
3. Sort and arrange your rocks in piles:
° Large, flat stones for your base
° Heartstones for filler rocks
° Pinning stones – smaller stone wedges to hold up the face rocks
° Face rock – to show off sides of the walls
° Through stones – long rocks placed sideways to tie face sides together
° Topping rocks – Flat, wide rocks to finish off wall and put weight on top
4. Dig your base 8″-12″ and level off.
5. Keep your course level. Use a string to keep your fence even.

The more time you take to place your stones, the better the outcome will be!

Just a few days ago we were in the middle of “Stella,” a March blizzard, but hope springs eternal that the gardens will be blooming soon at OPI!

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Ten years ago the Ocean Point Inn began increasing and amplifying its gardens and general landscaping. At that time our main features were the beautiful red geraniums that decorated many of our buildings.  This has been an OPI tradition for the past seventy years.

We now boast eighteen gardens decorated with perennials of many heights, colors and textures.  We have three stonewalls which help define our boundaries and provide backdrops for some of our gardens.

Over the years our plants spread and multiplied providing new plants to create new gardens. Most seasons they survive but some have to  be replaced due to Maine’s harsh winter weather.

A water element is always relaxing and you can enjoy watching our ducks swimming in the duck pond among our beautiful waterlilies. You can see that even the ducks take time to admire our aquatic plants and smell the lilies!

We use some of our plantings as cut flowers in the Inn.  Some of our favorite flowers include hydrangeas, hosta, rose campion, daisies, black-eyed Susans, phlox and lobelia.  The flowers flourish near the ocean and really love the fog!

Enjoy sitting amidst our gardens while enjoying the peace and solitude, a book, a cold beverage or a gorgeous OPI sunset!

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All Photo Rights Reserved © Bev Tabet Photography

Cod was what first brought Europeans to America for fishing.  The cod became very popular as a North Atlantic fish and that popularity led to the decline in cod we have today.Codfish1 cod2 cod3 cod5 cod6 cod7

Native Americans first fished for cod using hooks they made from bones and nets from natural materials.  Bones from the cod have been found in middens. (see former Blog Post on Middens)

About the time Columbus came to America there are reports of cod as large as men.  They were very plentiful and could be scooped from the sea in baskets.

The Native Americans showed the Pilgrims how to catch cod as use the parts not eaten as fertilizer.  They also taught them to catch and eat quahogs, clams and lobsters.

The Pilgrims established fishing stations with one in Penobscot Bay, Maine.  They caught the cod by sending two men out in a dory with hand lines.  The fish were dried and salted before being sold to Europe.  A poor quality product of cod called “West Indies Cure” was fed to the slave population in the Caribbean.  Cod fishing made the colonies prosperous.

In the 20’s and 30’s they started using gill nets and draggers to catch cod and the business increased throughout the 50’s.  Factory ships started catching and freezing the fish at sea.

In 1976 The Magnuson Act prohibited foreign fisheries inside the 200 mile zone around the United States.  Cod fish caught commercially has dropped significantly due to strict regulations started in the 1990’s.

Had cod fish never lived in the Gulf of Maine, our American history might have been very different.  Cod was once a natural resource of great political importance.  The fish could be salted, providing a long-lasting good source of protein.  During times of no refrigeration this was very important.

In the 50’s I remember being able to easily catch large cod near the White Islands off Ocean Point using the big wooden hand lines with fish line that smelled of creosote!  Cod was served at a lot of Maine tables in those days.  Salt cod served in a white sauce with eggs and potatoes was popular.  The salt cod was available in little wooden boxes in the markets.  Kids kept the boxes to store treasures in despite the fishy smell.

A New Year’s Resolution is a tradition that is most common in the Western Hemisphere, but is also found in the Eastern Hemisphere. res8 People make a promise to do an act of self-improvement or something nice for others.

Many resolutions had religious origins.  The Babylonians started the New Year by promising their gods to pay their debts and return borrowed goods.  The Romans made promises to the god Janus.  In the Medieval times, the knights reaffirmed their commitment to chivalry after Christmas.  During the Jewish high holidays, they seek and offer forgiveness for their errors.  Similarly, Christians make Lenten sacrifices.res1

As we near the end of January, how are you doing on the resolutions you made on January 1st?  Have you lost weight?  Has your diet improved?  Are you saving more money?  Are you exercising regularly?  Keeping those well intended resolutions is very challenging.

If you are going to succeed, it is best to have started before New Year’s Eve according to psychology professor, Art Markham.  You need preparation time.  Resolutions fail because people do not work hard enough at making them succeed.  Old habits get in the way.res5

First you need to focus on positive goals, not negative goals.  The negative goals are what you wish to stop doing.  You need to develop new habits and keep a record of your progress.

Make sure your plans are realistic.  For instance, if you are a total couch potato, do not set a goal of starting to walk six miles a day.  You are setting yourself up to fail.  It would be better to start by saying, “I will walk 30 minutes on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.  Once you succeed with that, increase your time gradually by 10 minutes each day.res2

Change your environment to help you stay on track.  If you are trying to diet, have only low calorie healthy snacks around.  Remove the chips and candy from your house.  If you are exercising, find a buddy to go with you.  It will make you much less likely to cancel and having someone to talk to makes the time go faster.

Accept the fact that there will be ups and downs.  Do not become discouraged on a down day.  Learn from it and keep moving forward.  Be kind to yourself and do not give up.

The top 10 resolutions are:res4

1.  Lose weight

2.  Getting organized

3.  Spend less, Save more

4.  Enjoy life to the fullest

5.  Stay fit and healthy

6.  Learn something exciting

7.  Quit smoking

8.  Help others

9.  Fall in love

10. Spend more time with family

45% of Americans usually make New Year’s Resolution, 17% infrequently make resolutions and 38% never make resolutions.  Unfortunately, only 8% are successful in achieving their resolutions.  75% maintain their goal for one week, 71% for two weeks, 64% for one month and 46% for six months or more.res3

Even if you can feel yourself slipping on your resolution, do not give up.  Stay positive, look at the record you are keeping and put yourself back on track.  Reward yourself periodically as you reach a goal.  You will be much happier with yourself if you maintain your goal.  Good luck – it is not too late to regroup and start again.

As you are purchasing the latest popular “toys” for children on the upcoming holidays, stop to think how these toys have changed in just the last 50-75 years.  Television is bombarding us with the latest electronic gifts of this season.  Fifty to seventy-five years ago in Maine very few people even had television to see such advertisements!  And, if they did have a TV, the number of channels was limited to three at the most even with a large antenna and rotor on the roof or “Rabbit Ears” on top of the set!  Children spent very little time watching television compared to today.  The first children’s show in Maine was the popular puppet, Howdy Doody!  How many remember the opening song, “It’s Howdy Doody time?”

Children were outside and active everyday.  After “supper” children in a neighborhood gathered to playhideandseek Hide and Seek, kickKick the Can, Giant Steps, Red Rover, Simon Says and Duck Duck Goose.  It was safe to rungames1 around the neighborhood and some games like Street Hockey were played in the street.  As dark approached, the mothers would call their children or ring a bell announcing it was time to come home.

Because safety was not an issue in those days, children were more independent.  At a young age, they could walk or ride their bikes to a neighborhood store, school or a friend’s house to play.  They learned to make good decisions and solve problems on their own.

Indoorpickupsticks games included Jacks, Pick up Sticks, dominoes Dominoes, Checkers, Mr. Potato Head, Rag Dolls, Yo-Yos, Tinker Toys, Lincoln Logs, Dress Up, Comic Books, Paper Dolls, Tops and View-masters.  For contemporary  children it is hard to imagine having fun doing these things.  The lack of video games, ipads, television cell phones, etc. forced children tojacks spend more time outside and play creatively.  They used their imaginations to create games from what they found.duckduckgoose

Families took car trips and played games with their children as they traveled.  Games included I Spy, Searching for License Plates, Counting Cows (you doubled the number if you passed a church and lost them all if you passed a cemetery) and singing songs.

The elementary school playgrounds offered other games.  Jumping Rope was big and the children jumped to wonderful rhymes such as:

House to let,

Apply within,

When I go out,

Mrs  ? (surname of next child) comes in.

jumprope

I had a little puppy,

His name was Tiny Tim.

I put him in the bathtub,

To see if he could swim.

He drank up all the water,

He ate a bar of soap.

The next thing you know,

He had a bubble in his throat.

In came the doctor

(person jumps in)

In came the nurse

(person jumps in)

In came the lady with the alligator purse.

(person jumps in)

Out went the doctor

(person goes out)

Out went the nurse

(person  goes out)

Out went the lady

With the alligator purse.

(person goes out)

games2

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, turn around,

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, touch the ground,

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, go upstairs,

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, say your prayers,

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, switch off the light,

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, say goodnight.

Goodnight, Teddy Bear, goodnight.

hopscotch

Polly in the kitchen,

Doing a bit of stitching,

In came a bogeyman,

And frightened her away!

redrover

All in together girls,

Very fine weather girls.

When I say your birthday

Please run out.

January, February, March, etc.

 

Hopscotch was popular.  The pattern was drawn in the dirt with a stick.  If you played on the sidewalk, the pattern was drawn with a piece of chalk.  The chalk was often pocketed from the classroom blackboard!

Marbles were played on the playground.  Children had a cloth bag to hold their marbles and they often traded marbles with friends.games3

Ball Against the Wall games could be played by an individual or a group taking turns.  Girls were more likely than boys to be drawn to this activity.  The accompanying rhymes determined how the game was played.  The following defines common actions with the small pink rubber ball.

Plainy:  The ball is simply thrown against the wall and caight.

Clappy:  As for Plainy, but clap hands when the ball is in the air.

Rolley:  Roll arms over one another when ball is in the air.

To Backey:  Clap hand behind back

Hippy:  Place hands on hips

Tippy:  Touch the ground

Jelly Bag:  The two hands are held together at the wrists and the fingers are spread wide to catch the ball.

Basket:  Weave and lock fingers of both hands together, with the knuckles facing backwards to you; the ball is caught in locked palms or “basket.”

The following rhyme includes the above actions.  “Plainy, clappy, rolley, to backey, Hippy, tippy, a jelly bag and basket”

 

Farmer in the Dell was a circle game that starts with one child, the farmer, in the center.  Another popular circle game was “Ring Around a Rosie, Pocket full of Posies,Ashes, ashes, We all fall down.”

 

Skipping was a favorite game and it too was done to rhymes like the one below.

Charlie Chaplin went to France

To teach the ladies how to dance.

First he did a heel-toe, then he did the kicks,

Then he did the rhumba, then he did the splits.

 

 

Ice skating was a winter activity that most children enjoyed.  They skated on local ponds, flooded school playgrounds and flooded backyards.  The ‘rinks” were often lighted and they skated in the iceskatingevening as well.  No one complained about having to help shovel the snow off the ice or the occasional frostbite in a toe!  Sidewalk skating was done with the metal skates that buckled over your shoes.

These games and toys are a far cry from the games and toys used today!  AS you have children around for the holidays or home on school vacation, try playing some of these games of the past with them.  They may actually have fun!